Botox Use in Dentistry
Skip ToContent

Family and Cosmetic Dentistry

Main Content

Botox Use in Dentistry

Needle Near MouthWhen most people think of Botox, they assume it’s performed solely as a cosmetic procedure used to maintain a youthful appearance and reduce lines and wrinkles. They wouldn’t be wrong; in fact, Botox is the most common cosmetic procedure out there. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons reported over 7.4 million Botox treatments in 2018. 

With all of this information, it may surprise you to learn that dentists are now using Botox as well! 

What is Botox? 

Botox is a drug made from a toxin known as Clostridium botulinum. This is the same toxin that can cause food poisoning called botulism, but its use as a paralytic has been approved by the FDA for cosmetic purposes. In other doses, Botox can also treat migraines, excessive sweating, excessing blinking, and an overactive bladder. 

Cosmetic Botox is used to block the nerve signals that control muscle movement. This softens the skin around the injection site and doesn’t allow the muscle to contract. Results can last up to three months and are typically seen after just a few hours. 

Botox in Dentistry 

Botox is now being used in dentistry because of its ability to block nerve endings. Botox in dentistry is used for the following problems: 

  • Treatment of TMJ (temporomandibular joint disorder) 
  • Lip adjustment before or after denture placement or oral surgery 
  • Improve a ‘gummy smile’ without undergoing surgery 
  • Treatment of grinding or clenching the teeth during sleep (bruxism) 

Using Botox at the dentist might cause some controversy, but it has many benefits both cosmetically and medically. In fact, around 10% of dentists are currently trained to administer Botox injections. 

For more information or if you’d like to schedule an appointment for a cleaning or exam, please contact Severance Dental located here in Severance, Colorado. Looking for a dentist in Pierce or an Eaton family dentist, contact us today.

Posted on Sep 9, 2019

Share:

Archives

2 Surprising Foods That are Harming Your Teeth
Jan 25, 2021, 7:52 PM
You probably are already aware that sugar and carbonated drinks are bad for your teeth and that drinking tea and coffee can…
Taking Care of Your Teeth During the Pandemic
Jan 11, 2021, 10:27 PM
The COVID-19 pandemic has drastically changed the way we perform simple tasks. The guidelines of staying confined within your…
Importance of Keeping an Eye On Your Gums
Dec 29, 2020, 10:52 AM
Most people don’t take gingivitis seriously. They tend to believe that it is harmless and only consider it a minor…
3 Subtle Signs You Need to See a Dentist
Dec 14, 2020, 7:40 PM
The chances are that you are already aware of most of the significant reasons that require a dental visit, such as toothache,…
The 7 Most Common Signs of Gum Disease
Nov 23, 2020, 1:11 PM
Gum disease is a widespread oral health issue, but it can be remarkably easy to overlook. There are two reasons for this; Not…